workshops

Bhakti Visualities

150 150 Regional Bhakti Scholars Network

organized by Amy-Ruth Holt and Karen Pechilis

Madison South Asia Conference - Oct 17, 2019

The aim of the Symposium was to explore the Conference theme of ‘Artistry’, as well as to extend the RSBN Symposium discussions, now in their sixth year, in the new direction of a specific focus on images of bhakti. Paper presentations were selected to reveal the ‘bhakti visuality’ or visual agency of imagery to pull out emotive sentiment from individuals and larger communities, to promote new forms of devotion and its circulation and shape social context, rather than just reflect it. Presentations took into account the use of textual sources to define visual imagery, but prioritized less emphasized fields of study such as bhakti images generated by image-making in performance (ritual, performing arts, material culture) and in the production and circulation of artistic images (fine and popular arts). Both historical and contemporary examples of bhakti were engaged, involving a range of scholarly viewpoints across academic disciplines, differing religious perspectives, visual mediums, and diverse cultural regions and languages. This Symposium was organized by Amy-Ruth Holt (Ph.D. in Art History, The Ohio State University) and Karen Pechilis (Professor of History and Religion, Drew University).

Main research questions engaging the presenters included: How do images of bhakti promote bhakti or translate bhakti? What meanings are emphasized in images that engage bhakti? Which aspects of bhakti imagery appear continuous with tradition and which seem new? Presenters explored the question within the themes of performance of modern bhakti social messages; unexpected portraits of bhakti; materiality as bhakti presence; and mass-produced images of bhakti. Papers in this Symposium expanded our understanding of bhakti through the diversity of people who engage bhakti through image devotion and the unexpected yet recognizable ways of interpreting bhakti that divulge the extent to which the audience they create reaches beyond traditional religious communities.

7:30 – 8:30

All Conference Coffee/Tea

8:30 – 8:45

Symposium Meet and Greet

8:45 – 9:00

 Symposium Opening Remarks

Gil Ben-Herut, Regional Bhakti Scholars Network

Amy-Ruth Holt and Karen Pechilis

9:00 – 10:15

Theme: Performing New Bhakti Social Messages

Karen Pechilis
Contemporary Performance of the Abject 

Ashlee Andrews
Expanding Meanings of Bhakti Through Bengali American Women’s Home Shrine Image-Making 

Jeremy Saul
The Popularization of Royal Hanumans: Visually Reconfiguring Bhakti for Modernity 

10:15 – 10:30

All Conference Break 

10:30 – 12:10

Theme: Unexpected Portraits of Bhakti

Murad Khan Mumtaz
`Neither am I Hindu, nor Muslim’: The Legacy of Poet-Saint Kabir in the Visual and Literary Culture of Early Modern Muslim South Asia

Amy-Ruth Holt
Visual Affirmations: Nithyananda’s Self-Portraits in Temple Sculpture and Online Videos

Ankur Desai
Darshan in Twelve Ways: Visualizing Godhead in the Early Swaminarayan Tradition

12:15 – 1:45

Lunch

2:00 – 3:30

Theme: Materiality as Bhakti Presence

Jack Hawley
The Iconic Surdas

Shandip Saha
The Visual Expression of Bhakti in a Vaiṣṇavite Community: Paintings and Photographs in the Devotional Life of the Puṣṭi Mārga

Harshita Mruthinti Kamath
Temple Padams on Copperplates: Visual Imageries of a Telugu Bhakti Poet

3:30 – 3: 45

All Conference Break

3:45 – 4:35

Theme: Mass Production and Circulation of Bhakti Images 

Richard Davis
The Beginnings of Mass-Produced Devotional Prints 

Shruti Patel
An Exercise in Negotiation: Visualizing Devotion at the Swaminarayan Museum in Contemporary Gujarat 

4:35 – 5:30

Identification and discussion of overarching connections and generative ideas from and across presentations. 

Also, thinking of topics for RBSN Symposium at Madison 2020.

5:30

Adjourn for Symposium group dutch-treat cocktail at Cask & Ale, 212 State Street, around the corner from Madison Concourse Hotel.

Contemporary Bhakti Encounters

150 150 Regional Bhakti Scholars Network

organized by Hannah H. Kim and Richard Davis

Madison South Asia Conference - Oct 11,2018

The 5th annual symposium of the RSBN focuses on ethnographic approaches to the study of bhakti. The aim is to balance the textual and broadly historical emphases of previous RSBN symposia. We encourage proposals from all scholars working with contemporary and living devotional communities, in all regions of South Asia. We anticipate that ethnographic perspectives will suggest approaches and raise questions for those who work on textual and archeological materials pertaining to bhakti. We also expect to address ethical issues arising from fieldwork with living communities.

This symposium encourages presenters to share new or ongoing fieldwork that contributes to our understanding of living bhakti and its multiple expressions in the contemporary world of South Asia. This includes both communities grounded on medieval bhakti traditions and new forms of devotional expression and community arising in colonial and post‐colonial South Asia. How do today’s communities offer strategies for living in the fast‐changing nations of southern Asia? In what ways does participation in a bhakti community offer ways of reframing citizenship and the relationship of individual and society? How do modern phenomena of mobility and national (and international) media affect questions of regionality and vernacularism in contemporary bhakti? In what ways are devotional performative traditions changing in contemporary settings? Are there changes in aesthetic understandings of bhakti arts?

The 2018 symposium theme also acknowledges the challenges that scholars working with contemporary bhakti communities encounter with respect to questions of authority, power, and ethics. We encourage discussion on a range of ethical issues and real‐time concerns that affect research with people whose practices and ideals have repercussions on bhakti research. What ethical concerns arise when the field researcher establishes trust and is given access to data whose publication could bring harm to the informant or community?

7:30 – 8:30

Light Breakfast

8:30 – 8:45

Welcome and Opening Comments

RBSN Co‐chairs: Gil Ben‐Herut and Jon Keune
Symposium Convenors: Hanna H. Kim and Richard Davis

8:45 – 10:15

Session I: Reframing the Bhakti Past Through the Ethnographic Present

Nancy M. Martin
Trance Encounters with Mirabai: Experiencing Presence in a Bhakti Milieu

Irina Glushkova
The Rise of the Domestic: Reclamation of New Bhakti Domains in Gangakhed and Alandi

Dušan Deák
Devotion and the Performance of Belonging: Lineage Strategies Among the Descendants of Sant Śekh Mahaṃmad Śrīgondekar

Gil Ben‐Herut
Ancient Texts. Modern Contexts: Ethnographical Cues for Reading Premodern Bhakti Literature in Kannada

10:15 – 10:30

Tea Break

10:30 – 12:00

Session II: Encountering Devotionalism and its Transnational and Performative Mediations

Sutopa Dasgupta
Indo‐Caribbean Bhakti: Devotional Protests in the Contemporary South Asian Diaspora

Claire C. Robison
A Return to a Place One Has Not Been: ISKCON and the Rhetoric of Bhakti Revivalism in Mumbai

Kalpesh Bhatt
Aural Devotion and Ethical Formation: The Practice of Śravaṇa‐bhakti in BAPS Swaminarayan Sanstha

Cynthia Packert
Renovating the Akshar Deri: A Case Study in Contemporary BAPS “Bhakti Visuality”

12:00 – 12:15

Open Discussion

12:15 – 1:45

Lunch

1:45 – 3:00

Session III: Roundtable Conversation

Fieldwork Ethics in Research on Contemporary Bhakti Communities
Emilia Bachrach (Moderator) with Andrew Kunze, Aalekhya Malladi, Jennifer D. Ortegren, and Shandip Saha

3:00 ‐ 3:30

Session IV: Transmitting Bhakti Through Performance

Aks and Lakshmi
Electronic Bhakti Music: Contemporizing North Indian Devotional Poetry

3:30 – 3: 45

Tea Break

3:45 – 5:15

Session V: Critiquing Critical Bhakti Scholarship and Addressing its Ethical Challenges

Swayam Bagaria
The Inoperativity of Sacrifice, The Commandment of Bhakti

Hanna H. Kim
Ethical Manoeuvres and Ethnographic Consequences in Swaminarayan Research

John S. Hawley
The Theme‐Parking of Vrindavan

5:15 – 5:30

Open Discussion and Closing Comments

Convenor (Richard Davis)

5:30 – 7:30

Madison South Asia All‐conference Reception

Madison Ballroom

6:15 – 7:15

Informal Symposium Dinner

Mirch Masala
449 State Street, Madison, WI 53703 (approx. o.4 miles from conference)

7:30 – 9:00

Conference Performance: Parvathy Baul

Wisconsin Ballroom

Modes of Bhakti

150 150 Regional Bhakti Scholars Network

organized by Archana Venkatesan and Davesh Soneji

Madison South Asia Conference - Oct 26, 2017

Last year, we experimented with a collaborative format that encouraged cross-regional, inter-linguistic and cross-religious dialog. The robust conversations that emerged helped us rethink the protean boundaries of bhakti as a category of analysis, paying particular attention to the tension between the ways bhakti is used emically, and how it is deployed in scholarly discussions of the subject. Equally, the role of social networks and institutions in formulating what constitutes bhakti also emerged as a dominant theme across the papers. This year’s symposium builds on the success of the collaborative format, but also offers a corrective to the over-reliance on textual materials as the primary resource in the study of bhakti. This year’s gathering invites a more sustained and informed engagement with bhakti along interdisciplinary lines, to bring art-historical and performative dimensions into dialogue with textual and historical studies of bhakti. This year’s theme encourages cross-disciplinary collaboration on bhakti to help us tackle not only what constitutes bhakti, but how it might be shaped in different medial forms.

Our program involves five collaborative, interdisciplinary teams. A four member team unpacks the relationship between yoga and bhakti using a variety of sources — textual, performative and historical — from four different linguistic and regional bhakti traditions from Maharashtra and North-central India. Another team examines cross regional representations of “sainthood” across popular cultural forms including, dance, theater, and cinema. Two collaborators focus on the Vallabha and Swaminarayan traditions to map the relationship of word, ritual, and musical performance. Conversations between two scholars of Islamic devotional literature in Telugu and Tamil demonstrate the negotiations, adaptations of different linguistic and cultural streams under the umbrella of bhakti. Our last group of scholars draw on inscriptional sources and ritual activity to focus on the South Indian temple as a site of bhakti religiosity.

The interdisciplinary, cross-regional theme of this symposium encourages adventurous conversations about bhakti, and is an important intervention in the text-heavy focus of bhakti studies. Moreover, this year’s symposium will include several new scholarly voices in bhakti studies, and will afford them the opportunity to present their research in the bhakti symposium for the first time. These experimental partnerships all revolve around the concerns that invigorate the RBSN: to understand what “bhakti” signifies in various contexts and the roles it has played in social history, literature, and politics.

8:30 – 9:00

Meet and Greet

9:00 – 9:10

Opening Remarks
Jon Keune: RBSN Update
Davesh Soneji and Archana Venkatesan: Modes of Bhakti

9:15 – 10:00

Tamil Temples in South India

Leslie Orr and Anna Seastrand
On the inscription and mural paintings of the Sri Vaikuntham Temple, Tirunelveli District

10:05 – 10:50

Hagiography of our Time

Jeff Brackett and Nancy M. Martin
On Tuka and Mira on Page, Stage and Screen

10:55 – 11:40

Performing Bhakti in Gujarat

Yogi Trivedi and Priya Kothari
On Katha and Kirthan, Vallabha and Swaminarayan

11:45 – 11:50

Short Discussion

12:15 – 1:30

Lunch

1:45 – 2:45

Bhakti and Women’s Voices

Karen Pechilis, Amy-Ruth Holt, Afsar Mohammad
On Karaikkal Ammaiyar, Jayalalithaa and Fatima

2:50 – 4:00

The Yoga of Bhakti

Linda Hess, Christian Novetzke, Daniel Gold, Patton Burchett
On the Yoga of Bhakti and the Bhakti of Yoga

4:00 – 4:10

Short Break

4:10 – 5:15

Open Discussion

5:30

Madison South Asia All‐conference Reception

Madison Ballroom

7:00

Dinner

Kabul
540 State Street

Beyond Familiar Boundaries

150 150 Regional Bhakti Scholars Network

organized by Jon Keune and Gil Ben-Herut

Madison South Asia Conference - Oct 20, 2016

This year’s symposium follows a more experimental format to push us out of our comfort zones and off familiar research paths: collaborative teams who intentionally cross boundaries. Using the RBSN listserv, scholars have located colleagues who shared a common interest to study intentionally from transdisciplinary, cross-regional, and inter-linguistic angles. Having committed to collaboration, each team sets a research agenda and presentation style that suits its peculiar needs. The freedom engendered in this approach makes it difficult to anticipate final outcomes, but the format encourages innovation by requiring participants to go beyond familiar linguistic and regional boundaries.

Our tentative program includes eight collaborative teams who explore a variety of issues. For example, some teams study topics with explicit ties across conventional boundaries, such ritual uses of bhakti for demonic deities in Kerala and Tamil Nadu, and a pandit-poet who composed both poetry and philosophy in both Marathi and Sanskrit. Other teams explore a common topic from distant locations, such as gendered discourse surrounding female Śaiva poet-saints in Kashmir and Tamil Nadu, and bhakti inflected literatures and practices at sufi dargahs in Andhra Pradesh and Delhi.

These collaborations arose because this symposium offers scholars an arena in which to experiment and discover new connections. The topics dealt with by the teams are as diverse as they are path-breaking and adventurous. Nonetheless, these partnerships all revolve around the basic concerns that drive the RBSN: to understand what “bhakti” signifies in various contexts and its relation to society, thought, literature, and politics in South Asia.

7:30 – 8:30

Light Breakfast

8:30 – 8:35

Welcome and Opening Comments

8:35 – 9:25

Anand Venkatkrishnan & Jon Keune
Punditry and Poetry, Sanskrit and Marathi

9:25 – 10:15

Dean Accardi & Karen Pechilis
Engendering Bhakti Networks in Kashmir and Tamil Nadu

10:15 – 10:30

Coffee Break

10:30 – 11:20

Afsar Mohammed & Anand Taneja
Devotion and Ethical Life: Looking at Dargah Literary Culture

11:20 – 12:10

Manpreet Kaur & Sohini Pillai
Bhakti on the Peripheries: The Pothī Prem Ambodh at the Court of Guru Gobind Singh and Vishnudas’s Pāṇḍavcarit at the Court of Dungarendra Singh

12:15 – 1:45

Lunch

1:45 – 2:35

Anne Monius & Gil Ben-Herut
South to Mt. Meru: A Comparative View of the Early Tamil and Kannada Saiva Literatures

2:35‐ 3:25

Elaine Craddock & Rich Freeman
Demonic Dynamics in the Deep South: Tamil Nadu and Kerala

3:30 – 3: 45

Coffee Break

3:45 – 4:35

Archana Venkatesan & Philip Lutgendorf
In the Company of Commentators: Trust and Travail in Translating Bhakti Classics

4:35 – 5:25

Harshita Kamath & Arun Jones
Bhakti and Religious Creativity

5:30 – 6:30

Madison South Asia All‐conference Reception

Madison Ballroom

7:15

Informal Dinner

Kabul
540 State Street

Who’s In, Who’s Out

150 150 Regional Bhakti Scholars Network

organized by Gil Ben-Herut and Jon Keune

Madison South Asia Conference - Oct 27, 2015

This year’s RBSN symposium explores a key rhetorical motif – the religious Other and acts of othering. Who are the Others of regional bhakti traditions’ saints and poets, how do they position themselves over against Others, and how do these Others vary from region to region?  Are there broad patterns in how sociopolitical contexts raise the stakes of making such judgments and marking boundaries? How are Others actually represented (through text, performance, ritual, etc.) and are these representations mirrored in sources outside what we identify as associated with “bhakti”? And what discursive strategies are employed in the process of othering?

Exploring such questions within this framework has multiple benefits.  The diversity of South Asian devotional traditions makes them an especially rich source for examining social and religious fault lines across India, thereby furthering our understanding of how communalism and sectarianism form. An intentionally multi-regional and multi-linguistic analysis of “who is out” of the bhakti fold can illuminate trends, interests, and motivations for demarcating “who is in” within the rubric of devotionalism.  Do all bhakti traditions similarly constitute their own identities by setting themselves off against explicitly Others? Can we find patterns in understanding what constitutes a “good” bhakta and thus an identifiable core of bhakti, or are the various constructions too disparate from each other?

Two important categories within the conversation of the bhakta’s Other: so-called “orthodox” Hinduism, most often represented by figurations of the Brahmin, and non-bhakti competitors (yogis, tantrikas, village goddess followers, etc.), as well as “non-Hindus” entirely (Jains, Muslims, etc.).   How much do these categories retroject contemporary boundary sensibilities onto a past that had different social contours and typologies of alterity? This symposium reconsiders inherited, often over-simplified notions of the bhakta’s Other and unmask processes of representation that involve adoption, appropriation, and rejection of different social and religious agents. Drawing on the diverse expertise of the RBSN members and other participants, this symposium enables a broad yet context-specific and nuanced discussion that will deepen understanding of the South Asian religious landscape.

7:30 – 8:30

Light Breakfast

8:30 – 8:45

Welcome and Thematic Introduction

8:45 – 10:15

Pulling Others In

Rich Freeman
Fraught Constituencies: Coercion and Inclusion in Kerala Bhakti

Harshita Kamath Mruthinti
Kshetrayya: The Outsider

Dušan Deák
Devotion and the Performance of Belonging: Lineage Strategies Among the Descendants of Sant Śekh Mahaṃmad Śrīgondekar

Jon Keune
Playing with Boundaries: The Atypical Bhaktas of Eknath’s Allegorical Poetry

10:15 – 10:30

Coffee Break

10:30 – 12:15

Competition and Separation I

Christian Novetzke
Free Market Bhakti: Competition and Exclusion in the Formation of the Mahanubhav and Varkari Communities

Gil Ben-Herut
Arguing with Vaiṣṇavas, Annihilating Jains: Two Religious Others in Early Kannada Śivabhakti Hagiographies

Patton Burchett
Competition, Interlogue, and Identity among the Bhaktas, Sufis, and Yogis in Early Modern North India

Elaine Craddock
Kali Moves Into Tamil Country

12:15 – 1:45

Lunch

1:45 – 3:30

Competition and Separation II

Anne Monius
A Caste of Gluttons Plucking Hair from Their Heads: The Fate of Jains as Religious ‘Other’ in Tamil Śaiva Literature

Jeremy Morse
The Guru-bhakti of the Datta Saṃpradāya and Its Many “Others”

Philip Lutgendorf
Who are the Damned (in the Mānas Lake of Tulsīdās)?

Divya Cherian
Fall from Grace? Untouchables and Hindus in Eighteenth-Century Marwa

3:00 ‐ 3:30

Session IV: Transmitting Bhakti Through Performance

Aks and Lakshmi
Electronic Bhakti Music: Contemporizing North Indian Devotional Poetry

3:30 – 3: 45

Coffee Break

3:45 – 4:45

Reckoning Difference

Anand Venkatkrishnan
Atheists in Potholes: Mimamsakas Debate the Bhaktimarga

Velcheru Narayana Rao
Was It Ever a Revolt? The Beginning and End of Bhakti

4:45 – 5:30

Open Discussion

5:30 – 6:30

Madison South Asia All‐conference Reception

Madison Ballroom

7:00

Dinner

Kabul
540 State Street

On the Idea of the Bhakti Movement

150 150 Regional Bhakti Scholars Network

organized by Gil Ben-Herut and Jon Keune

Madison South Asia Conference - Oct 16, 2014

The trope of “the bhakti movement”—with its concomitant geographical, theological, and social claims—has been deeply and problematically influential in shaping modern understandings of how Hindu traditions developed in South Asia from the 9th century onwards. Jack Hawley’s book, A Storm of Songs: India and the Idea of the Bhakti Movement (Harvard University Press, 2015), unearths the deep, nearly forgotten history of this trope, revealing several phases in which it was formulated and propagated by various parties for various ends. In this meeting, ten respondents who specialize in diverse regions and languages will comment on Hawley’s work and highlight ways in which awareness of inter-regional bhakti connections differs from region to region. This meeting is part of an effort to investigate the historical, textual, institutional, and social dimensions of the regional Hindu devotional traditions, and it builds on conversations that were begun with the inception of the Regional Bhakti Scholars Network in 2013.

9:00 – 9:10

Opening comments

9:10 – 9:30

Short introduction by Jack Hawley

9:30 – 9:50

Christian Novetzke (Washington)

9:50 – 10:10

Rachel McDermott (Barnard/Columbia)

10:10 – 10:30

Tyler Williams (Columbia)

10:30 – 10:50

Neelima Shukla-Bhatt (Wesleyan)

10:50 – 11:10

Jon Keune (Houston)

11:10 – 11:45

Jack’s response & discussion

11:45 – 1:00

Lunch

1:00 – 1:20

Anne Monius (Harvard)

1:20 – 1:40

Gil Ben-Herut (South Florida)

1:40 – 2:00

Rich Freeman (Duke)

2:00 – 2:20

Elaine Craddock (Southwestern)

2:20 – 2:40

Velcheru Narayana Rao (Emory)

2:40 – 3:00

Heidi Pauwels (Washington)

3:00 – 3:30

Coffee/tea (hotel restaurant)

3:30 – 4:00

Jack’s response & discussion

4:00 – 5:30

Discussion of regional perspectives on bhakti & movement

7:00

Dinner

Kabul
540 State Street

Bhakti Between the Elite and the Popular

150 150 Regional Bhakti Scholars Network

organized by Jon Keune, Gil Ben-Herut, Anne Monius

Center for the Study of World Religion, Harvard University - May 19-20, 2014

This workshop seeks to investigate how bhakti traditions understood their target audiences, especially vis-à-vis the common scholarly conceptualization of such audiences as popular, socially inclusive, and non-elite. Modern scholarship on literary histories in South Asia often has referred to a distinction between vernacular-language poetry that is composed in high/courtly/sophisticated registers in order to promote the language’s illustrious status versus poetry that explicitly aspires to be accessible to wider, popular audiences. More often than not, bhakti traditions and their literatures have been perceived to be associated with the latter category, aimed at the non-elite masses, linked to traditions of open, public performance, and expressing horizons that consciously traverse social boundaries of caste and gender. In the regional variations of this generic distinction between uses of vernacular language (rīti/bhakti in Hindi, pant/sant in Marathi, mārga/dēsi in Kannada, and caṅkam/patti in Tamil) we find some of the most articulate conceptions of “the masses” or “the popular” in early modern South Asia—a crucial development in both literary and social history.

But what work does this taxonomic distinction actually accomplish? To what extent does it reflect sentiments found in early bhakti compositions themselves, and how much does it grow out of later historiographical interventions that try to use bhakti pasts for other purposes? How exactly do bhakti authors refer to their audiences such that we now assume them to be popular and non-elite, and to what extant have we imposed modern sociological categories on this material? Was the “popular” truly as inclusive as is commonly assumed, or are traditional conceptions of audience more socially nuanced in ways that have been overlooked? Are there tangible connections between vernacular ideas about popular audience and the appearance of the compound strīśūdrādi in Sanskrit literature? Can we identify a pattern of when this distinction and its implied a sense of “the popular” appear in history; does this correspond to a common set of political or social conditions under which the unification of diverse groups became useful? Keeping in mind Sheldon Pollock’s influential argument against the importance of bhakti traditions for the development of vernacular languages, how ought we understand then the widely shared idea in many regional traditions that bhakti literature is poetry for the people? Most generally, what do we and can we know with confidence about the precise makeup of bhakti traditions’ audience?

By considering various regional examples of how bhakti literature squares with the elite/non-elite dichotomy and how a notion of “the popular” is articulated, we hope to achieve a clearer understanding of bhakti traditions’ audiences and thereby illuminate more precisely the roles of these traditions in literary, social, and intellectual history.

Monday, May 19, 2014

8:15 – 9:00

Breakfast / coffee

9:00 – 9:30

Welcome, opening comments

9:30

Christian Novetzke (Washington)
The Language of Men in the World of Gods: Religion, Vernacularization, and Everyday Life in Medieval India

10:30

Velcheru Narayana Rao (Emory)
Irreverent questions about Bhakti

11:30

Rich Freeman (Duke)
Conundrums in the Formation of Bhakti in Kerala

12:30 – 1:30

Lunch

1:30

Gil Ben-Herut (South Florida)
‘I’ll sing as I love:’ The Literary Intervention of Bhakti in Kannada Literary History

2:30

Tyler Williams (Columbia)
Scholarship, manuscripts and merchants in the bhakti public of early modern Rajasthan

3:30 – 4:00

Coffee

4:00

Jon Keune (Houston)
Relations Across the Sant/Pant Divide: Eknāth to Mukteśvar and Mahīpati to Moropant

5:00

Discussion

6:30

Dinner

Tuesday, May 20

8:15 – 9:00

Breakfast / coffee

9:00

Tony K. Stewart (Vanderbilt)
Jaban Haridās: The Strange Tales of the Sufi who Practiced Kṛṣṇa Dhikr

10:00

Anne Monius (Harvard)
Is Bhakti Poetry Properly Literary? The View from Tamiḻ- Speaking South India

11:00 – 1:00

Discussion, including possible next steps

1:00 – 2:00

Lunch

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